the spirit song native indian revue

Cast Shot Happy

 

Spirit Song is a celebration of First Nations tradition that is such an important part of our Canadian culture. This large-scale revue features both traditional Aboriginal songs, dances and rituals plus contemporary music based on Native themes.


The show begins with a traditional blessing and welcome dance by the The Eagle Song Native Mask Dancers. The First Nations troupe, comprised of elders and youth of the Squamish Nation, have performed internationally at cultural festivals in Switzerland, Taiwan, and Japan.  They are well known for their presentations at the Hiwus Feast House on top of Grouse Mountain, in addition to being featured in the opening ceremonies of the Vancouver 2010 Olympics. The Eagle Song Dancers have entertained many tourists with their beautiful mask dance and ancient stories.

Following the Eagle Song Dancers will be White Thunder Dance Theatre featuring Gary Abbott, a Champion First Nations Hoop Dancer who truly captions the spirit of Canada’s Aboriginal People. He has performed for The Wild Salmon Rally, Simon Fraser University Aboriginal Day, and Fraser Valley Bald Eagle Festival in addition to numerous cultural events. Gary has shared his Native traditions with countless visitors to British Columbia and has performed at many corporate events including the opening of the new Vancouver Convention Centre.

 


The Spirit Song Native Indian Revue continues with  two beautiful First Nations female vocalists performing the Grammy nominated Aboriginal  song “The Enlightened Time" in addition to  “O Siem We Are All Family” by Canadian recording artist Susan Aglukark.  The music of this Inuit singer/songwriter is filled of Native themes. The finalé features all performers and the dramatic words and music of and the powerful Pow Wow rhythms of  another Susan Aglukark song; “Hina Na Ho” .

The Spirit Song Native Indian Revue truly captures the Westcoast spirit and is ideal for any event of function looking for a unique example of the Canadiana experience.

 


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featured first nations vocalists

melody courage

Melody Courage of the Métis People, one of the first recognized Aboriginal groups in Canada, is a Vancouver based coloratura soprano and has a great love for her work and art. She has earned a degree and a diploma in Opera Performance from the Vancouver Academy of Music. Melody has performed professionally with Vancouver Opera for the past eight years, touring with their ensemble as The Queen of the Night from Mozart's "Magic Flute". Along with her dedication to singing, she is passionate about her Métis heritage. Melody recently performed solo works with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra for 'Planet Indigenous', as well as the solo soprano in The Spirit of Haida Gwaii oratorio for the opening of Vancouver's Inaugural Cultural Olympiad.



leah alfred

Our show also features Leah Alfred from the 'Namgis Band, Kwakiutl Nation. Ms. Alfred studied opera at UBC and the University of Victoria. She has appeared in UBC Opera's production of Louis Riel and has been a featured soloist with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. She has performed in China and the Czech Republic in addition to numerous performances across Canada. Both Leah and Melody were featured vocalists in the Vancouver Opera’s First Nations themed production of ‘The Magic Flute” in which Bob Baker of Eagle Song Dancers, was cultural advisor.


spirit song full cast

Our Friend     Ernie Phillip

"Ernie Philip, a full-blooded Shuswap First Nations elder, is a Champion fancy dancer who taught me a great deal about Native Customs and First Nations Protocol. He is not as active as when I first met him at Expo 86 but still meets and greets  tourists at Quaaout Lodge in  Shuswap.

 The wisdom that he shared over the years has given me a deep understanding for Native culture and enabled me to produce Aboriginal performances for corporate events in an manner that is both respectful of  First Nations traditions and entertaining for the audience.

PLUS he is a pretty funny guy:  After parking at the Museum of Anthropology for a major event Ernie refused to pay for parking saying 'we own all this land..how can you charge me?' I was happy to insert a few loonies into the meter!"

Al Guraliuk